elettaria: (Trans-friendly equal marriage symbol)
In the wake of the Woolwich murder, I've been reading a few people who are horrified and alarmed at the strongly racist response that's occurring, both in the media and amongst the general public. This IS my home, you racist swine is an article by a woman talking about her experiences of "'my difference' or to put it in correct terms 'other peoples' racism'". She's Asian British, and I've also been reading responses from people who are black British, or immigrants who are white British.

All this has made me think about racism, ethnicity and identity politics, and how they affect me. Read more... )

To return to the Woolwich situation, I also want to say that I too am absolutely horrified at the amount of racism coming out in response, and concerned about the safety of people of colour and Muslims. I'm thinking of you, and I hope you stay safe.
elettaria: (Default)
I have just been reading this article with interest. It discusses clashes between different religions, and between religion and secularism, mainly on the subject of physical objects. For those who don't know my background, I was raised Jewish and practised for some years until realising a few years ago that I am an atheist, at which point I stopped attending synagogue as I don't like religious hypocrisy. I believe in freedom of expression including freedom to practise a religion, but I also believe that religions shouldn't get a Get Out Of Jail Free card when it comes to human rights, and these two beliefs can conflict with each other until the cows come home. My Jewish background will always be with me and it does colour my attitudes. For example, like other Jews I really don't like proselytisation. Some people might see it as leading lost souls to God. I see all its history of destroying cultures, forcing people into hiding, fuelling violence, encouraging bigotry.

For the examples given in that article, I agree with some and disagree with others. Read more... )

PSA

Monday, 24 August 2009 12:15 pm
elettaria: (Default)
There have been a couple of people commenting on my journal whom I am not happy having here because they boycott Israel. I'd like them to stay away. I've disabled comments as I don't want a discussion about this, but for the sake of people who can't see how this is a form of anti-Semitism, here are a few points.

Read more... )

Here's a fun one

Wednesday, 17 June 2009 01:03 am
elettaria: (Default)
Light sensors cause religious row

Quite apart from the fact that there's a perfectly good case to make against the idea that Jews should not turn electrical lights on or off during the Sabbath, am I right in thinking that something automated might come under different rules, that there are laws about not interfering with nearby non-Jews if they're doing something for their own benefit (involving the weird notion of the Shabbes goy), and the possibility of overriding ecological concerns? How does this case compare with automated street lighting? What systems for stairwell lighting do they use in Israel?

Organ donation

Saturday, 2 June 2007 09:41 pm
elettaria: (Default)
There's quite a fuss going on right now over a Dutch TV show that has proved to be a hoax, the Big Donor Show in which an actress posed as a terminally ill woman interviewing three candidates to see which one most deserves to get one of her kidneys. I'm not intending to discuss that here, though you can read a thoughtful discussion of it here. I'll just say that I find the idea extremely unpleasant and feel that there are better ways of raising the profile of organ donation. I'd rather talk about organ donation itself.

Like many people, I'd heard of it but not really thought about it much. [livejournal.com profile] ladyvivien changed that. Her mother has been the recipient of a donated kidney and she is extremely passionate about organ donation issues. There was a proposal at the time that organ donation should be made an opt-out system in the UK, so that unless people deliberately opted out they would be on the organ donation register. In case anyone reading this is not aware, there is a terrible shortage of organ donors. [livejournal.com profile] ladyvivien was in favour of the bill, which didn't pass. I wasn't, because while I do feel that something dramatic needs to be done to create a large enough pool of organ donors, I don't feel that your body belongs to the state and I believe that it should be a choice whether or not to be a donor. The system I envisage as ideal would present people with the opportunity to sign up as organ donors, for example asking anyone who registered with a doctor's surgery or got a driving licence (which would cover the vast majority of the population between them), and by this I mean giving them a form that made them tick a yes or no box, not just having leaflets sitting around the surgery. This would, I hope, increase the pool to a large enough size without forcing anyone, since many people, most I think, would in fact agree if they were asked, they're just not asked. And since few people really want to think about the possibility of their own death, let alone in gory detail (who wants to think about having their eyes removed?), people aren't that likely to go out of their way to sign up, they'll just avoid the topic while being vaguely in favour of it.

I signed up a while later, I think it didn't happen until something else prodded me and I'd spent a couple of years meaning to get around to it when there were the appropriate forms available. I signed up online in the end, which may be done at this link. I later proceeded to tell my parents about this in a way which I wouldn't suggest following. It was when I was reading up on human sacrifice for an essay on Titus Andronicus, in which a defeated enemy is sacrificed at the beginning of the play, and started wondering whether the Romans ever practised human sacrifice. My stepfather's a history nut, so I rang my parents to ask, and all this reading about removal of body parts reminded me that I needed to tell them I was on the organ donation register. My mother answered the phone, and the conversation went something like this:

Me: Hi, darling, how are you? Is C-- there? By the way, I'm signed up as an organ donor.
My mother [not taken it in yet]: Er, yes, here he is.
[Fascinating conversation in which C-- and I conclude that no, the Romans did not practise human sacrifice, and thus Titus' sacrifice of Alarbus was way out of line.]
C--: Lovely talking to you, I'll give you back to your mother now.
Mother: What the hell do you mean you're signed up as an organ donor?

This might not have been the best way to broach the subject. Thankfully we got it straightened out in the end, and while my mother is one of the people who really doesn't want to think about the whole topic, she respects my decision.

So anyway, however the topic is brought to light, I'd urge anyone who hasn't signed up as a donor already to think about it deeply, and if you decide that you wish to sign up, get around to it now - and then tell your next of kin in a suitable manner.

Organ donation

Saturday, 2 June 2007 09:41 pm
elettaria: (Default)
There's quite a fuss going on right now over a Dutch TV show that has proved to be a hoax, the Big Donor Show in which an actress posed as a terminally ill woman interviewing three candidates to see which one most deserves to get one of her kidneys. I'm not intending to discuss that here, though you can read a thoughtful discussion of it here. I'll just say that I find the idea extremely unpleasant and feel that there are better ways of raising the profile of organ donation. I'd rather talk about organ donation itself.

Like many people, I'd heard of it but not really thought about it much. [livejournal.com profile] ladyvivien changed that. Her mother has been the recipient of a donated kidney and she is extremely passionate about organ donation issues. There was a proposal at the time that organ donation should be made an opt-out system in the UK, so that unless people deliberately opted out they would be on the organ donation register. In case anyone reading this is not aware, there is a terrible shortage of organ donors. [livejournal.com profile] ladyvivien was in favour of the bill, which didn't pass. I wasn't, because while I do feel that something dramatic needs to be done to create a large enough pool of organ donors, I don't feel that your body belongs to the state and I believe that it should be a choice whether or not to be a donor. The system I envisage as ideal would present people with the opportunity to sign up as organ donors, for example asking anyone who registered with a doctor's surgery or got a driving licence (which would cover the vast majority of the population between them), and by this I mean giving them a form that made them tick a yes or no box, not just having leaflets sitting around the surgery. This would, I hope, increase the pool to a large enough size without forcing anyone, since many people, most I think, would in fact agree if they were asked, they're just not asked. And since few people really want to think about the possibility of their own death, let alone in gory detail (who wants to think about having their eyes removed?), people aren't that likely to go out of their way to sign up, they'll just avoid the topic while being vaguely in favour of it.

I signed up a while later, I think it didn't happen until something else prodded me and I'd spent a couple of years meaning to get around to it when there were the appropriate forms available. I signed up online in the end, which may be done at this link. I later proceeded to tell my parents about this in a way which I wouldn't suggest following. It was when I was reading up on human sacrifice for an essay on Titus Andronicus, in which a defeated enemy is sacrificed at the beginning of the play, and started wondering whether the Romans ever practised human sacrifice. My stepfather's a history nut, so I rang my parents to ask, and all this reading about removal of body parts reminded me that I needed to tell them I was on the organ donation register. My mother answered the phone, and the conversation went something like this:

Me: Hi, darling, how are you? Is C-- there? By the way, I'm signed up as an organ donor.
My mother [not taken it in yet]: Er, yes, here he is.
[Fascinating conversation in which C-- and I conclude that no, the Romans did not practise human sacrifice, and thus Titus' sacrifice of Alarbus was way out of line.]
C--: Lovely talking to you, I'll give you back to your mother now.
Mother: What the hell do you mean you're signed up as an organ donor?

This might not have been the best way to broach the subject. Thankfully we got it straightened out in the end, and while my mother is one of the people who really doesn't want to think about the whole topic, she respects my decision.

So anyway, however the topic is brought to light, I'd urge anyone who hasn't signed up as a donor already to think about it deeply, and if you decide that you wish to sign up, get around to it now - and then tell your next of kin in a suitable manner.
elettaria: (Chocolate teapot)
I'm just back from London, and will write about my adventures properly later, though it may be friends-locked. Meanwhile, here are photos of the finished holy tea towel challah cloth and the mug I made for D.

Pictures! And explanations )
elettaria: (Chocolate teapot)
I'm just back from London, and will write about my adventures properly later, though it may be friends-locked. Meanwhile, here are photos of the finished holy tea towel challah cloth and the mug I made for D.

Pictures! And explanations )
elettaria: (Vespucci)
My best friend's kid sister (who's three years older than my boyfriend, but I'll ignore that, I've known her since she was three and I'm allowed to call her that) is getting married in October. I'm thinking of making them a challah cloth for the wedding, does it strike you as a good present for a young couple? I'm not sure of her level of observance, but I spoke to her mother last night who says that they do Friday night and seemed to think it would be a good present. I'm still fairly new at sewing and embroidery, although I made my own tallit last year and will hopefully be embroidering a Torah mantle once we sort it out with the shul council.

Any ideas for designs, and what size would people recommend? I have to confess that I don't do challah myself, being vegan, and anyway my family has always gone for a single challah whereas I think they use two. At the moment I'm gazing at a challah cloth my grandmother made which is 18" by 21" and trying not to think that I'm turning into my grandmother. Current design idea is a pomegranate tree. Read more... )

Would anyone be interested in joined an interfaith community for crafts and such related to religion and spirituality, by the way? I know people who make rosaries and people who make tzitzit, for instance.

cross-posted to my journal, [livejournal.com profile] faith_feminists and [livejournal.com profile] jewishwomen
elettaria: (Vespucci)
My best friend's kid sister (who's three years older than my boyfriend, but I'll ignore that, I've known her since she was three and I'm allowed to call her that) is getting married in October. I'm thinking of making them a challah cloth for the wedding, does it strike you as a good present for a young couple? I'm not sure of her level of observance, but I spoke to her mother last night who says that they do Friday night and seemed to think it would be a good present. I'm still fairly new at sewing and embroidery, although I made my own tallit last year and will hopefully be embroidering a Torah mantle once we sort it out with the shul council.

Any ideas for designs, and what size would people recommend? I have to confess that I don't do challah myself, being vegan, and anyway my family has always gone for a single challah whereas I think they use two. At the moment I'm gazing at a challah cloth my grandmother made which is 18" by 21" and trying not to think that I'm turning into my grandmother. Current design idea is a pomegranate tree. Read more... )

Would anyone be interested in joined an interfaith community for crafts and such related to religion and spirituality, by the way? I know people who make rosaries and people who make tzitzit, for instance.

cross-posted to my journal, [livejournal.com profile] faith_feminists and [livejournal.com profile] jewishwomen
elettaria: (Default)
So, good old Pesach is round again, meaning that I'm trying to cook vegan without any wheat products. I made sushi for the first time yesterday, and it went rather well. The first few were a mess ("let's chalk that up to experience," said [livejournal.com profile] catnip_junkie, so we wolfed them), but after that we got the hang of it and made lots of the pretty little things and ate far too much. The accompanying dishes were a bit of a challenge, poor [livejournal.com profile] catnip_junkie came back from the library and was greeted with, "Right, I'm still sorting out the rice, you go through my Japanese cookbook and see if there's anything that doesn't include soya sauce because that has wheat in it," but we managed somehow, including making a miso dressing for the salad instead of a standard soya sauce/sesame oil/rice vinegar one, and a broccoli dish that was actually Chinese but never mind. The sushi contained cucumber, shiitake mushroom or red pepper, and I had some picked ginger with mine.

Anyway, there's a Shabbat morning service and study session tomorrow, which means that we're meant to bring lunch, and I'm thinking of bringing sushi since a) it's fab and b) it's good finger food. You're really meant to eat it with soya sauce as a dipping sauce, together with pickled ginger and possibly a few other things. Does anyone have any ideas what I can bring? Something that's easily transportable, bear in mind. I was thinking of making up one batch of sushi with tofu, spread with sesame seeds and put on a layer of pickled ginger, so that it would have a bit more flavour and also look cool (you'd get the green nori outside, then the white rice, then the pink ginger, then the white tofu with sesame seeds lurking). Or perhaps do something else with the tofu: it's really beautiful, fresh, soft white tofu (from a Glasgow company, if anyone's interested). I believe that umeboshi plums can be used in some form, but so far all I have is umeboshi plum seasoning, which is something like vinegar, and not the paste that is more usual. And anyway, what would I do with it? Assuming it's open today, it being Good Friday and all, I have a nice little Chinese supermarket across the road. It's not a huge one, so it doesn't stock the likes of fresh galangal, but there's a decent amount in the two rooms that it does have. Inspiration, anyone, either for sushi fillings or for things that can be eaten with it, like some kind of dipping sauce?

cross-posted to my LJ, [livejournal.com profile] jewishvegan and [livejournal.com profile] ukvegans
elettaria: (Default)
So, good old Pesach is round again, meaning that I'm trying to cook vegan without any wheat products. I made sushi for the first time yesterday, and it went rather well. The first few were a mess ("let's chalk that up to experience," said [livejournal.com profile] catnip_junkie, so we wolfed them), but after that we got the hang of it and made lots of the pretty little things and ate far too much. The accompanying dishes were a bit of a challenge, poor [livejournal.com profile] catnip_junkie came back from the library and was greeted with, "Right, I'm still sorting out the rice, you go through my Japanese cookbook and see if there's anything that doesn't include soya sauce because that has wheat in it," but we managed somehow, including making a miso dressing for the salad instead of a standard soya sauce/sesame oil/rice vinegar one, and a broccoli dish that was actually Chinese but never mind. The sushi contained cucumber, shiitake mushroom or red pepper, and I had some picked ginger with mine.

Anyway, there's a Shabbat morning service and study session tomorrow, which means that we're meant to bring lunch, and I'm thinking of bringing sushi since a) it's fab and b) it's good finger food. You're really meant to eat it with soya sauce as a dipping sauce, together with pickled ginger and possibly a few other things. Does anyone have any ideas what I can bring? Something that's easily transportable, bear in mind. I was thinking of making up one batch of sushi with tofu, spread with sesame seeds and put on a layer of pickled ginger, so that it would have a bit more flavour and also look cool (you'd get the green nori outside, then the white rice, then the pink ginger, then the white tofu with sesame seeds lurking). Or perhaps do something else with the tofu: it's really beautiful, fresh, soft white tofu (from a Glasgow company, if anyone's interested). I believe that umeboshi plums can be used in some form, but so far all I have is umeboshi plum seasoning, which is something like vinegar, and not the paste that is more usual. And anyway, what would I do with it? Assuming it's open today, it being Good Friday and all, I have a nice little Chinese supermarket across the road. It's not a huge one, so it doesn't stock the likes of fresh galangal, but there's a decent amount in the two rooms that it does have. Inspiration, anyone, either for sushi fillings or for things that can be eaten with it, like some kind of dipping sauce?

cross-posted to my LJ, [livejournal.com profile] jewishvegan and [livejournal.com profile] ukvegans
elettaria: (Rock badger)
Why God Never Received Tenure at Any University

1. He only had one major publication.
2. It was in Hebrew.
3. It had no references.
4. It wasn't published in a refereed journal.
5. Some even doubt He wrote it Himself.
6. It may be true that He created the world, but what has He done since then?
7. His cooperative efforts have been quite limited.
8. The scientific community has had a hard time replicating His results.
9. He never applied to the Ethics Board for permission to use human subjects.
10. When one experiment went awry, He tried to cover it up by drowning the subjects.
11. When subjects didn't behave as predicted, He deleted them from the sample.
12. He rarely came to class, just told students to read the book.
13. Some say He had His son teach the class.
14. He expelled His first two students for learning.
15. Although there were only ten requirements, most students failed His tests.
16. His office hours were infrequent and usually held on a mountain top.

BAD JOKE DISCLAIMER: We recognize that religious humor can be risky. It is our hope that by laughing at ourselves (and others) we can make this subject more approachable. If you find any of these objectionable, we apologise. Many were posted on Beliefnet, some were passed along via email and others spotted on other websites. As with most jokes, the original authors are unknown.

Nabbed from my synagogue newsletter, disclaimer and all, and originally found by my friend R.
elettaria: (Rock badger)
Why God Never Received Tenure at Any University

1. He only had one major publication.
2. It was in Hebrew.
3. It had no references.
4. It wasn't published in a refereed journal.
5. Some even doubt He wrote it Himself.
6. It may be true that He created the world, but what has He done since then?
7. His cooperative efforts have been quite limited.
8. The scientific community has had a hard time replicating His results.
9. He never applied to the Ethics Board for permission to use human subjects.
10. When one experiment went awry, He tried to cover it up by drowning the subjects.
11. When subjects didn't behave as predicted, He deleted them from the sample.
12. He rarely came to class, just told students to read the book.
13. Some say He had His son teach the class.
14. He expelled His first two students for learning.
15. Although there were only ten requirements, most students failed His tests.
16. His office hours were infrequent and usually held on a mountain top.

BAD JOKE DISCLAIMER: We recognize that religious humor can be risky. It is our hope that by laughing at ourselves (and others) we can make this subject more approachable. If you find any of these objectionable, we apologise. Many were posted on Beliefnet, some were passed along via email and others spotted on other websites. As with most jokes, the original authors are unknown.

Nabbed from my synagogue newsletter, disclaimer and all, and originally found by my friend R.
elettaria: (Rock badger)
I'm currently attempting to read through the Bible, something I've been meaning to do for years. I do a half-hour stint every morning while perched in front of my lightbox, using my lovely New Oxford Annotated Bible which people here recommended. (For certain values of "every".) At the moment I'm half-way through Deuteronomy, and something has just struck me.

There's a passage in Deuteronomy 22 when penalties for rape and illicit sex are imposed. If a man marries a woman and goes off her when he sleeps with her, all is dependent on whether or not there's a stain on the sheet to prove her virginity (a myth for which there is no medical evidence, as the NOAB tartly points out). If there is, he gets a fine and a bad reputation, but has to stay married to her; if there isn't, she gets stoned. If a couple are caught in adultery, both get stoned. If a man rapes an engaged woman in the town, they both get stoned (she because she didn't scream for help, "and the man because he violated another man's wife. You must purge the evil from among you"); if it's in the country (i.e. no one could hear her scream) then only he dies. If a man rapes an unengaged woman, he must marry her and pay her father a fine. Many of these end with "you must purge the evil from among you", or however it's translated (NIV was the best I could find online at my usual site). From Deuteronomy 20, if a man fancies a captive woman, he must give her a month to mourn her parents then marry her, he can't enslave her.

Read more... )
elettaria: (Rock badger)
I'm currently attempting to read through the Bible, something I've been meaning to do for years. I do a half-hour stint every morning while perched in front of my lightbox, using my lovely New Oxford Annotated Bible which people here recommended. (For certain values of "every".) At the moment I'm half-way through Deuteronomy, and something has just struck me.

There's a passage in Deuteronomy 22 when penalties for rape and illicit sex are imposed. If a man marries a woman and goes off her when he sleeps with her, all is dependent on whether or not there's a stain on the sheet to prove her virginity (a myth for which there is no medical evidence, as the NOAB tartly points out). If there is, he gets a fine and a bad reputation, but has to stay married to her; if there isn't, she gets stoned. If a couple are caught in adultery, both get stoned. If a man rapes an engaged woman in the town, they both get stoned (she because she didn't scream for help, "and the man because he violated another man's wife. You must purge the evil from among you"); if it's in the country (i.e. no one could hear her scream) then only he dies. If a man rapes an unengaged woman, he must marry her and pay her father a fine. Many of these end with "you must purge the evil from among you", or however it's translated (NIV was the best I could find online at my usual site). From Deuteronomy 20, if a man fancies a captive woman, he must give her a month to mourn her parents then marry her, he can't enslave her.

Read more... )
elettaria: (Pigeon)
I have all of Shakespeare* on DVD! They came in a huge cardboard box, which led me to wonder how on earth I'm going to get them all down to Stratford, but then half of that was filled with packaging. The actual box is still quite large and heavy, with all of the plays in slim but solid DVD cases, so I'll have to get one of those multi-DVD cases (irritatingly, I'd just bought one with a capacity of 24 DVDs). The packaging is much nicer than I'd expected. There's an accompanying booklet telling you about the project, with snippets of info such as Cleopatra finding that her snake had unexpectedly crawled down the back of her dress, or how they just about managed to avoid electrocuting anyone with the waterlogged woodland set of Dream. The settings are almost entirely period (either the setting of the play or Shakespeare's time), which isn't always the most effective way of doing things but should always be seen at some point. Mostly. Apparently the first Henriad is filmed in a children's adventure playground.

I do know that some of these are meant to be rather crap, but so far it's all sounding really exciting. Derek Jacobi is feted for his Richard II (having seen it once, I agree) and his Hamlet, Helen Mirren is all over the place, stars such as John Gielgud and Anthony Hopkins are wandering about, and you get some unexpected ones such as John Cleese as Petrucchio (apparently not playing it the way you'd expect) and Ron Cook (you know, the comic actor whom I primarily associate with the Carry On films) as Richard III. The films are long. Three hours seems to be about standard. Because they're not messing around with the usual pretty film stuff, such as sweeping shots of scenery, the proportion of time spent speaking the text is going to be very high, I'd imagine pretty much as high as it is in a stage production. There are still cuts, I noticed quite a few when watching Richard II in uni the other day, but not many.

And I went to Figaro last night, and it was lovely, and I kept running into people I know there. Edinburgh is indeed a small place. It's nice, it really makes you feel at home, though it'll teach me not to go out with a boring hairdo and no contact lenses or make-up on the basis that I'd be sitting in a dark theatre and no one would see me.

I should really be making more notes on Hamlet, but I'm practically falling asleep, between all the stuff I've had on lately and my sleep pattern being a bit screwed up, so I think I might curl up and watch Cymbeline.

*That is to say, all of the plays except The Two Noble Kinsmen, due to unreasonable prejudice against co-authored plays unreasonable prejudice against Fletcher (and dammit, I like Fletcher) unreasonable prejudice against Very Gay Plays its not being considered part of the Shakespeare canon at the time of filming.

P.S. My rules for not working on Shabbat/the Sabbath are that I don't do my "job", i.e. studying. Since that usually means reading, and I read non-stop and lots of things could be either work or pleasure (yes, I've been known to read articles on incest in Jane Austen purely for fun), I usually draw the line at whether I'm reading with a pen in my hand or making notes at the computer. How does it work if I'm watching a filmed version of one of my set texts, which will be useful academically, but not actually doing anything at the time other than curling up and enjoying it (and thinking, of course. You can't really ban thinking)? Would it count if I watched Cymbeline this evening, or should I go and watch one of the ones I'm not studying next term?
elettaria: (Pigeon)
I have all of Shakespeare* on DVD! They came in a huge cardboard box, which led me to wonder how on earth I'm going to get them all down to Stratford, but then half of that was filled with packaging. The actual box is still quite large and heavy, with all of the plays in slim but solid DVD cases, so I'll have to get one of those multi-DVD cases (irritatingly, I'd just bought one with a capacity of 24 DVDs). The packaging is much nicer than I'd expected. There's an accompanying booklet telling you about the project, with snippets of info such as Cleopatra finding that her snake had unexpectedly crawled down the back of her dress, or how they just about managed to avoid electrocuting anyone with the waterlogged woodland set of Dream. The settings are almost entirely period (either the setting of the play or Shakespeare's time), which isn't always the most effective way of doing things but should always be seen at some point. Mostly. Apparently the first Henriad is filmed in a children's adventure playground.

I do know that some of these are meant to be rather crap, but so far it's all sounding really exciting. Derek Jacobi is feted for his Richard II (having seen it once, I agree) and his Hamlet, Helen Mirren is all over the place, stars such as John Gielgud and Anthony Hopkins are wandering about, and you get some unexpected ones such as John Cleese as Petrucchio (apparently not playing it the way you'd expect) and Ron Cook (you know, the comic actor whom I primarily associate with the Carry On films) as Richard III. The films are long. Three hours seems to be about standard. Because they're not messing around with the usual pretty film stuff, such as sweeping shots of scenery, the proportion of time spent speaking the text is going to be very high, I'd imagine pretty much as high as it is in a stage production. There are still cuts, I noticed quite a few when watching Richard II in uni the other day, but not many.

And I went to Figaro last night, and it was lovely, and I kept running into people I know there. Edinburgh is indeed a small place. It's nice, it really makes you feel at home, though it'll teach me not to go out with a boring hairdo and no contact lenses or make-up on the basis that I'd be sitting in a dark theatre and no one would see me.

I should really be making more notes on Hamlet, but I'm practically falling asleep, between all the stuff I've had on lately and my sleep pattern being a bit screwed up, so I think I might curl up and watch Cymbeline.

*That is to say, all of the plays except The Two Noble Kinsmen, due to unreasonable prejudice against co-authored plays unreasonable prejudice against Fletcher (and dammit, I like Fletcher) unreasonable prejudice against Very Gay Plays its not being considered part of the Shakespeare canon at the time of filming.

P.S. My rules for not working on Shabbat/the Sabbath are that I don't do my "job", i.e. studying. Since that usually means reading, and I read non-stop and lots of things could be either work or pleasure (yes, I've been known to read articles on incest in Jane Austen purely for fun), I usually draw the line at whether I'm reading with a pen in my hand or making notes at the computer. How does it work if I'm watching a filmed version of one of my set texts, which will be useful academically, but not actually doing anything at the time other than curling up and enjoying it (and thinking, of course. You can't really ban thinking)? Would it count if I watched Cymbeline this evening, or should I go and watch one of the ones I'm not studying next term?

DIY tallit

Tuesday, 7 June 2005 02:11 pm
elettaria: (red lily)
I'm thinking of making myself a tallit [Jewish prayer shawl]. For further details on what that is, together with a very insane conversation with my mother on the subject, plus an erudite discussion of the way religious garments get gendered (which side-tracked into subjects such as how hot some men look in eyeliner), look at my post last night in [livejournal.com profile] faith_feminists.

The short version is that being vegan, almost all conventional talitot are out for me since they are usually made with wool and/or silk, I've only seen one set of pure cotton ones and they cost a bomb, and I don't like the acrylic ones (shiny and with silver or gold in it is not my style), though you never know, I might see something suitable in Jerusalem next month. So I'm messing around at home with scraps practising applique and contemplating embroidery, and keeping an eye open for scarves which could be made into talitot. What do you think of this one? The one thing I'm not sure about is if the fabric turns out to be shiny, and for some reason the seller keeps ignoring me when I ask that (though she's answered other questions). I've never encountered polished cotton, does anyone know what it's like? The size is pretty standard for a tallit, the fringes look appropriate, the colour's right, I'd prefer cotton for the sake of coolness anyway, and she says that it's about the same weight as her husband's tallit.

DIY tallit

Tuesday, 7 June 2005 02:11 pm
elettaria: (red lily)
I'm thinking of making myself a tallit [Jewish prayer shawl]. For further details on what that is, together with a very insane conversation with my mother on the subject, plus an erudite discussion of the way religious garments get gendered (which side-tracked into subjects such as how hot some men look in eyeliner), look at my post last night in [livejournal.com profile] faith_feminists.

The short version is that being vegan, almost all conventional talitot are out for me since they are usually made with wool and/or silk, I've only seen one set of pure cotton ones and they cost a bomb, and I don't like the acrylic ones (shiny and with silver or gold in it is not my style), though you never know, I might see something suitable in Jerusalem next month. So I'm messing around at home with scraps practising applique and contemplating embroidery, and keeping an eye open for scarves which could be made into talitot. What do you think of this one? The one thing I'm not sure about is if the fabric turns out to be shiny, and for some reason the seller keeps ignoring me when I ask that (though she's answered other questions). I've never encountered polished cotton, does anyone know what it's like? The size is pretty standard for a tallit, the fringes look appropriate, the colour's right, I'd prefer cotton for the sake of coolness anyway, and she says that it's about the same weight as her husband's tallit.

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