elettaria: (Trans-friendly equal marriage symbol)
Apparently it is Blogging Against Disablism day. I am pretty tired today, so you are going to get random witterings. But hey, it's not as if there's a shortage of material.

Dignity )

Scroungers? Not so much )

You want benefits? I hope you've worked for years to earn them. )

As for "disablism", it's not a word I use myself. It sounds odd. People usually don't know what it means. It's not universally accepted. This shows just how bad the situation is: we don't even have the language to describe the hatred we face. I wish I were exaggerating when I said "hatred".
elettaria: (Trans-friendly equal marriage symbol)
I've been reading an excellent article about white privilege and feminism called This is white privilege by Reni Eddo-Lodge. After a much-needed discussion of racism and transphobia within the modern feminist movement, she goes on to relate her experience of trying to explain what it feels like to be discriminated against to a white woman.

I told her about a recent experience of being passed over for a job I’d interviewed for and finding out through mutual friends that the job had gone to a white woman my age with almost identical experience to me. Read more... )

Yet another community

Tuesday, 4 May 2010 02:22 pm
elettaria: (Default)
[livejournal.com profile] crip_crit is now in existence. It's for discussing the portrayal of disability in literature, TV and film. Everyone is welcome, and [livejournal.com profile] ladyvivien, if you don't come over and discuss Collins, I will personally spank you.

Incidentally, could any nice person come up with a good icon we can use for the community? I'm stumped on that one.

Ways of seeing

Tuesday, 23 March 2010 12:10 pm
elettaria: (Beech leaves)
I've been thinking about seeing, and how people with disabilities are part of the social construct of looking and being looked at.

Children look at things and people with unmalicious curiosity, before they're taught by adults not to stare. I think that not staring is primarily about maintaining boundaries and privacy (eye contact is usually taboo on public transport, where you may be pressed so closely to strangers that you can feel the contents of their pockets), but staring is also about wanting to look at something unusual in order to understand it. We don't give real training in how to look at something we find unusual or threatening, and are left with the options of staring invasively or refusing to look. Read more... )
elettaria: (Default)
I just updated ColorfulTabs, and found myself rather irritated by the language being used, which was no doubt meant well but comes off as condescending. I'm curious to know what other folks think. Please do talk about this further in the comments.

[Poll #1480654]
elettaria: (Beech leaves)
There's a discussion about a recent racial incident going on in a friend's journal. She's a nice liberal person, her friends seem to be nice liberal people, and they're starting from the sort of basis of anti-bigotry that I expect from my friends as well.

Then someone used the term "spaz". I politely asked them not to, explaining that it's a derogatory term deriving from an older word for people with cerebral palsy, "spastic". I was agressively told to stop sanctimoniously monitoring other people's language, and that the term didn't have the meaning I claimed any more.

I've just about stopped shaking, and I still feel rather sick. I didn't expect to come across this sort of attack in that environment, let alone to be told that I had no right to request that someone stopped using such an offensive term. I'm particularly distressed that someone who is capable of having an intelligent, sensitive discussion about the finer points of racism, someone who evidently means well, is perfectly happy to use disability as an insult and cannot see the problem.

So for the benefit of all those people who don't think there's anything wrong with the term "spaz", let's look at how it's defined. I'm using Urban Dictionary, which I reckon is a decent barometer of current slang usage. I'm picking out the ones which particularly strike me, but they're all derogatory and about 90% refer to some feature of disability.

Definitions and a little ranting )

So yes. If someone uses language which indicates that they hold people with disabilities in contempt, I will be upset and I will be angry. If they silence me yet again and tell me that I have no right to complain, that I have no say in the language which defines me, I will be absolutely bloody furious.
elettaria: (Default)
Today is International ME/CFS Awareness Day. You can read other blog posts about it here. In its honour, here are a few things you may not know about ME. I'm pulling figures out of articles I've read recently that seemed reputable, though I don't have the energy right now to look up where I got each of the stats from. I may write some more personal posts about this later in the week. One excellent blog post that I have just read may be found here.

Read more... )
elettaria: (Default)
Today is International ME/CFS Awareness Day. You can read other blog posts about it here. In its honour, here are a few things you may not know about ME. I'm pulling figures out of articles I've read recently that seemed reputable, though I don't have the energy right now to look up where I got each of the stats from. I may write some more personal posts about this later in the week. One excellent blog post that I have just read may be found here.

Read more... )

Considering netbooks

Thursday, 30 April 2009 10:14 am
elettaria: (Default)
Once I can afford it, I'm seriously considering having another try at a netbook. For all of those of you who have them, could you be kind enough to answer these questions for me? I'll have to get an XP version because the RNIB audiobook service only runs on NetPlexTalk, which only runs on Windows.

List of questions )

Considering netbooks

Thursday, 30 April 2009 10:14 am
elettaria: (Default)
Once I can afford it, I'm seriously considering having another try at a netbook. For all of those of you who have them, could you be kind enough to answer these questions for me? I'll have to get an XP version because the RNIB audiobook service only runs on NetPlexTalk, which only runs on Windows.

List of questions )
elettaria: (Spiral aloe)
I posted to my journal in August about the problem I'm having with my local pharmacy refusing to print prescription labels that I can actually read. I'm finally getting around to writing a letter to them about it, and here's what I've written so far.

Letter to Boots )

How does this look? Am I getting across what I need and how their current provisions miserably fail to meet my needs, and how legally they're required to make provisions that suit me, rather than telling me, "This is what we provide for people who are visually impaired, if it doesn't suit you then you have the wrong disability"? The one-size-fits-all-disabilities is quite sadly a common approach, and it's really hard to get across that it just won't do. The RNIB legal team are willing to hop in and help once I've got past the first stage of sending this letter. The local pharmacy are trying to palm me off with the excuse that it's not up to them, it's the head office that makes such decisions, but I think I need to be dealing with the actual pharmacy where I'm having the problem.

Cross-posted to my journal, [livejournal.com profile] low_vision and [livejournal.com profile] cfids_me.
elettaria: (Spiral aloe)
I posted to my journal in August about the problem I'm having with my local pharmacy refusing to print prescription labels that I can actually read. I'm finally getting around to writing a letter to them about it, and here's what I've written so far.

Letter to Boots )

How does this look? Am I getting across what I need and how their current provisions miserably fail to meet my needs, and how legally they're required to make provisions that suit me, rather than telling me, "This is what we provide for people who are visually impaired, if it doesn't suit you then you have the wrong disability"? The one-size-fits-all-disabilities is quite sadly a common approach, and it's really hard to get across that it just won't do. The RNIB legal team are willing to hop in and help once I've got past the first stage of sending this letter. The local pharmacy are trying to palm me off with the excuse that it's not up to them, it's the head office that makes such decisions, but I think I need to be dealing with the actual pharmacy where I'm having the problem.

Cross-posted to my journal, [livejournal.com profile] low_vision and [livejournal.com profile] cfids_me.
elettaria: (Green lobster coffee cosy)
[livejournal.com profile] codeman38 and I have just created [livejournal.com profile] visual_stress, for anyone who experiences symptoms of visual stress. It's also known as visual processing disorder, Meares-Irlen Syndrome, Irlen Syndrome, or Scotopic Sensitivity Syndrome, and it takes the form of unpleasant visual distortions or eyestrain when reading, sometimes with headaches or migraine as well. It's commonly treated with colour, for instance in the form of acetate overlays for paper or tinted spectacles. You can read more about it here. There's a strong connection with dyslexia, and some people with processing problems have co-existing auditory processing disorder or other neurological issues.

You don't have to be diagnosed with visual stress to join, just to have difficulties in this general area. People with ME/CFIDS, migraine, MS, epilepsy, autism spectrum disorders or ADD/ADHD, for example, often experience visual problems of this nature.
elettaria: (Green lobster coffee cosy)
[livejournal.com profile] codeman38 and I have just created [livejournal.com profile] visual_stress, for anyone who experiences symptoms of visual stress. It's also known as visual processing disorder, Meares-Irlen Syndrome, Irlen Syndrome, or Scotopic Sensitivity Syndrome, and it takes the form of unpleasant visual distortions or eyestrain when reading, sometimes with headaches or migraine as well. It's commonly treated with colour, for instance in the form of acetate overlays for paper or tinted spectacles. You can read more about it here. There's a strong connection with dyslexia, and some people with processing problems have co-existing auditory processing disorder or other neurological issues.

You don't have to be diagnosed with visual stress to join, just to have difficulties in this general area. People with ME/CFIDS, migraine, MS, epilepsy, autism spectrum disorders or ADD/ADHD, for example, often experience visual problems of this nature.
elettaria: (Triffid geranium)
Computer programmer creates a prosthetic finger with a USB drive embedded for himself.

Obviously at this level it's a nifty gadget rather than a revolution in itself, but just think where this idea could lead when applied to larger prosthetics. Very promising.
elettaria: (Triffid geranium)
Computer programmer creates a prosthetic finger with a USB drive embedded for himself.

Obviously at this level it's a nifty gadget rather than a revolution in itself, but just think where this idea could lead when applied to larger prosthetics. Very promising.

Going wireless

Thursday, 12 March 2009 10:24 am
elettaria: (Autumnal bedspread)
There's a secret they don't tell you about wireless devices. Have too many of them together and if they're on the same radio frequency, they may fight. I ended up returning items that appeared not to work, making umpteen calls to manufacturers and the very useful (though overpriced) Keyboard Company, and even asking my neighbours whether they had an Xbox, before discovering the simple fact that it was my router in the living room that was upsetting all those wireless keyboards and mice. My wireless keyboard and mouse now live in the bedroom, where they more or less behave themselves. I have a nice little setup in the living room, with a laptop stand on the sewing desk which raises the screen to a much better viewing height, has a cooling fan, and a USB hub which stays connected to peripherals such as the external hard drive and a wired keyboard and mouse. All I need to do is plonk the laptop on the stand, plug it into the power socket, and plug in the USB connector from the laptop stand. The wired keyboard is a Keysonic mini one, roughly the same as a laptop keyboard without the number pad, so between that and the laptop stand holding the laptop fairly high, I actually end up with more desk space than I would have with the laptop alone, as well as the ergonomic benefits. There's also a brand new wireless printer/scanner/photocopier on a shelf behind the desk, which connects via the router and doesn't seem to clash with anything. I've been told that I should be able to set my router to another frequency so that it stops interfering with all the other equipment that wants to run on 2.4Ghz. Unfortunately, no one told the router this, and it doesn't seem to be possible.

Keyboards

Back to the bedroom! A wireless keyboard and mouse are very, very useful if you're stuck in bed a lot of the time. Overbed tables are fantastic, but while they might put the laptop at a good place for viewing, try typing at one and you'll spend the entire time struggling to get comfortable and developing aches in muscles you didn't know you had. Wired peripherals seem like the easiest solution, until you realise that you end up ensconced in a nest of cables, at risk of tripping over one and pulling the laptop over when you get out of bed. The first wireless keyboard I tried... )

Keyboard and mouse on quilt 1


Mice )

Headphones )

Going wireless

Thursday, 12 March 2009 10:24 am
elettaria: (Autumnal bedspread)
There's a secret they don't tell you about wireless devices. Have too many of them together and if they're on the same radio frequency, they may fight. I ended up returning items that appeared not to work, making umpteen calls to manufacturers and the very useful (though overpriced) Keyboard Company, and even asking my neighbours whether they had an Xbox, before discovering the simple fact that it was my router in the living room that was upsetting all those wireless keyboards and mice. My wireless keyboard and mouse now live in the bedroom, where they more or less behave themselves. I have a nice little setup in the living room, with a laptop stand on the sewing desk which raises the screen to a much better viewing height, has a cooling fan, and a USB hub which stays connected to peripherals such as the external hard drive and a wired keyboard and mouse. All I need to do is plonk the laptop on the stand, plug it into the power socket, and plug in the USB connector from the laptop stand. The wired keyboard is a Keysonic mini one, roughly the same as a laptop keyboard without the number pad, so between that and the laptop stand holding the laptop fairly high, I actually end up with more desk space than I would have with the laptop alone, as well as the ergonomic benefits. There's also a brand new wireless printer/scanner/photocopier on a shelf behind the desk, which connects via the router and doesn't seem to clash with anything. I've been told that I should be able to set my router to another frequency so that it stops interfering with all the other equipment that wants to run on 2.4Ghz. Unfortunately, no one told the router this, and it doesn't seem to be possible.

Keyboards

Back to the bedroom! A wireless keyboard and mouse are very, very useful if you're stuck in bed a lot of the time. Overbed tables are fantastic, but while they might put the laptop at a good place for viewing, try typing at one and you'll spend the entire time struggling to get comfortable and developing aches in muscles you didn't know you had. Wired peripherals seem like the easiest solution, until you realise that you end up ensconced in a nest of cables, at risk of tripping over one and pulling the laptop over when you get out of bed. The first wireless keyboard I tried... )

Keyboard and mouse on quilt 1


Mice )

Headphones )
elettaria: (Spiral aloe)
Returning to the blogging for Asus project, they have six computers they'll be lending out. Something that looks like a smaller iMac, a 17" gaming laptop, a 15" personal entertainment laptop, a 14" business laptop, a 12" "Ecobook" laptop in bamboo, and a 10" top-spec netbook, the S101. The last two immediately caught my eye. I already have a nice multipurpose 17" laptop, everyone makes those these days, they do what laptops generally do. It's the possibilities of ultra-small laptops, where it's more of a challenge cramming everything in and getting it to work well, that interest me.

Ecobook on bamboo


Decisions, decisions )

The Ecobook

I felt a visceral tug when I saw this laptop. Part of me took one look and joyously squealed, "Trees!" Like Ursula Le Guin, who prides herself on being "the most arboreal science fiction writer", I have a slight obsession with trees. My desktop backgrounds are always botanical, my quilts are becoming more and more so, and I could tell you every kind of wood that I have in my flat, from the rosewood Bluthner piano to the beech doorknobs on my kitchen units to the cheapie untreated pine bookcases in the hall. Anything which evokes trees is a instant hook-in for me.

I don't spend all my time metaphorically swinging about in the branches, though, so let's look at this a mite more analytically. Read more... )
elettaria: (Spiral aloe)
Returning to the blogging for Asus project, they have six computers they'll be lending out. Something that looks like a smaller iMac, a 17" gaming laptop, a 15" personal entertainment laptop, a 14" business laptop, a 12" "Ecobook" laptop in bamboo, and a 10" top-spec netbook, the S101. The last two immediately caught my eye. I already have a nice multipurpose 17" laptop, everyone makes those these days, they do what laptops generally do. It's the possibilities of ultra-small laptops, where it's more of a challenge cramming everything in and getting it to work well, that interest me.

Ecobook on bamboo


Decisions, decisions )

The Ecobook

I felt a visceral tug when I saw this laptop. Part of me took one look and joyously squealed, "Trees!" Like Ursula Le Guin, who prides herself on being "the most arboreal science fiction writer", I have a slight obsession with trees. My desktop backgrounds are always botanical, my quilts are becoming more and more so, and I could tell you every kind of wood that I have in my flat, from the rosewood Bluthner piano to the beech doorknobs on my kitchen units to the cheapie untreated pine bookcases in the hall. Anything which evokes trees is a instant hook-in for me.

I don't spend all my time metaphorically swinging about in the branches, though, so let's look at this a mite more analytically. Read more... )

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